A burn injury can be one of the most painful and devastating injuries a person can suffer. Three of the more common types of burn injuries include: chemical burns, electrical burns and thermal burns. Chemical burns are caused by tissue exposure to a strong acid or alkali, such as phosphorus or mustard gas. The severity of a chemical burn depends on how long the chemical is in contact with the skin; immediately flushing the skin with large amounts of water is essential to minimize the damage.

Electrical burn injuries can occur when an electrical current runs through the body. The electrical current may cause a burn injury in multiple areas, which can include the current’s points of entry and exit on the skin, and the muscles and tissue through which the current passes. The electrical shock can damage the bones, blood vessels and nerves, and a fatal heart attack may also result if the electrical current passes through the center of the body.

The most common type of burn injury, a thermal burn injury, occurs as a result of residential fires, automobile accidents, heaters, gasoline, or electrical malfunctions. Burn injuries typically include: flame burns; hot liquid burns, deep burns caused by liquids such as coffee, hot grease, soup or hot water; and flash injuries, which are burns to exposed skin that are often caused by explosions.

Burn injuries are classified as first, second, or third-degree burns. The higher the degree, the more severe the injury. First-degree burn injuries affect the outer layer of skin. They are superficial burns that usually cause redness, swelling and pain. Sunburn is an example of a first-degree burn. While painful, it will usually heal on its own and not cause permanent damage.

Second-degree burns cause damage to several layers of the skin. Classified as either superficial or deep, second-degree burns affect the outer part of the dermis as well as the inner layers. Superficial second-degree burns only affect the outermost part of the dermis, causing pain, sensitivity, redness and blisters. Deep second-degree burns extend to the deepest layers of the dermis and appear as dry, white areas that are painful to the touch. Second-degree burns usually do not require surgery but skin grafting is sometimes an option for people with extensive injuries. Scarring may result from second-degree burns.

Third-degree burns are the most serious type of burn injuries. All layers of skin are affected, as well as underlying tissue, and produce a brown or black leathery appearance. Third-degree burns usually require surgical skin grafting or transplantation.

Our lawyers have experience handling burn cases of varying severity. Burn cases can have significant value as the injuries are typically severe. As a result, it is important to retain experienced trial attorneys to handle your case. Contact us for a free case evaluation.

Does the Firm Handle Cases in My Hometown?

Yes. Doyle Law is a national law firm. We represent clients in catastrophic injury cases across the country. Our lawyers are licensed to practice in California, New York, Florida, and the District of Columbia. The attorneys of Doyle Law will obtain admission in any state where our technical expertise and trial experience can make a difference.

Statute of Limitations

The laws of personal injury vary in each state. In addition, there are time limits (statute of limitations) within which you must file any legal action. If you do not file legal action within the statute of limitations in your state, you may forfeit your right to recover damages. If you believe you have a claim for lack of informed consent, do not wait. Seek professional advice immediately.

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